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dc.contributor.authorSvare, Helgenb_NO
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-19T11:17:21Z
dc.date.available2014-12-19T11:17:21Z
dc.date.created2003-12-04nb_NO
dc.date.issued2003nb_NO
dc.identifier126232nb_NO
dc.identifier.isbn82-471-5259-2, h.nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/229066
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this work is to show that this established image of Kant as a philosopher who ignores embodied human existence is radically wrong. Not only does Kant throughout his career, in works published before and after the Critique, constantly reflect upon the fact that human life is embodied. He also invest igates in detail how this affects us. Discussing human cognition, for instance, he enduringly emphasises that cognition is embodied, and that the const itution of the human body has a profound impact on our way of experiencing the world. For instance where our experience of space is concerned, it is based on the awareness we have of our bodies and embodied acts. This idea is found in the first scholarly work t hat Kant published in 1747, and is later repeated in publications from 1768, 1786 and the finally in 1798, shortly before his death.nb_NO
dc.languageengnb_NO
dc.publisherFilosofisk instituttnb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDoktoravhandlinger ved NTNU, 1503-8181nb_NO
dc.subjectKanten_GB
dc.subjectImmanuelen_GB
dc.subjectPhilosophy of minden_GB
dc.subjectErfaringno_NO
dc.subjectDoktoravhandlingno_NO
dc.titleIn situ corpori : Kant's theory of experience interpreted in the context ofhis theory of the embodied mindnb_NO
dc.typeDoctoral thesisnb_NO
dc.source.pagenumberVI, 343 s.nb_NO
dc.contributor.departmentNorges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Det humanistiske fakultet, Filosofisk instituttnb_NO
dc.description.degreeDr.philos.nb_NO
dc.description.degreeDr.philos.en_GB


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