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dc.contributor.authorGodager, Geir
dc.contributor.authorHennig-Schmidt, Heike
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jing Jing
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jian
dc.contributor.authorYang, Fan
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-05T10:08:42Z
dc.date.available2024-02-05T10:08:42Z
dc.date.created2023-05-22T17:47:44Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationNordic Journal of Health Economics. 2023, 6 (1), 182-215.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1892-9729
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/3115527
dc.description.abstractIt is rarely the case in medical practice that differences between female and male physicians can be described under ceteris paribus conditions. Physicians self-select their type of practice, patients self-select physicians, and physicians are expected to account for both the context and the characteristics of their patients when providing medical treatment. As a result, reported gender differences in medical practice can have several alternative interpretations. A key question, therefore, is whether the treatment of a given patient is expected to depend on the gender of the physician. To address this question, we quantify gender effects using data from an incentivized laboratory experiment, in which Chinese medical doctors and Chinese medical students choose medical treatment under different payment schemes. We estimate preference parameters of females and males assuming decision makers have patient-regarding preferences. We cannot reject the hypothesis that gender differences in treatment choices are absent. The differences between preference parameters of females and males are not statistically significant, and there is no evidence that the degree of randomness in choices differs between genders. The absence of gender effects in the laboratory, where choice context is fixed, provides nuance to previous findings on gender differences, and highlights the general difficulty of separating individuals’ behavior from their context.en_US
dc.description.abstractDoes gender affect medical decisions? Results from a behavioral experiment with physicians and medical studentsen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://journals.uio.no/NJHE/article/view/10135
dc.rightsNavngivelse 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/deed.no*
dc.titleDoes gender affect medical decisions? Results from a behavioral experiment with physicians and medical studentsen_US
dc.title.alternativeDoes gender affect medical decisions? Results from a behavioral experiment with physicians and medical studentsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.source.pagenumber182-215en_US
dc.source.volume6en_US
dc.source.journalNordic Journal of Health Economicsen_US
dc.source.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5617/njhe.10135
dc.identifier.cristin2148580
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 231776en_US
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 296114en_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1


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Navngivelse 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Navngivelse 4.0 Internasjonal