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dc.contributor.authorKjelsvik, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorSekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit
dc.contributor.authorMoi, Asgjerd Litleré
dc.contributor.authorAasen, Elin Margrethe
dc.contributor.authorNortvedt, Per
dc.contributor.authorGjengedal, Eva
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-10T15:38:34Z
dc.date.available2020-02-10T15:38:34Z
dc.date.created2019-02-13T09:42:02Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationNursing Ethics. 2019, 26 (7-8), 2135-2146.nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn0969-7330
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2640874
dc.description.abstractBackground While being prepared for abortions, some women experience decisional ambivalence during their encounters with health personnel at the hospital. Women’s experiences with these encounters have rarely been examined. Objective The objective of this study was to explore ambivalent abortion-seeking women’s experiences of their encounters with health personnel. Research design The data were collected in individual interviews and analysed with dialogical narrative analyses. Participants and research context Thirteen women (aged 18-36 years), who were uncertain of whether to terminate their pregnancies during the first trimester, were interviewed before and after they made their decisions. The participants were recruited at six Norwegian outpatient clinics. Ethical considerations Approval was granted by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics. Findings The ambivalent pregnant women sought to make autonomous decisions while simultaneously involving their closest confidants and health personnel in the process. The following three types of narratives of women’s experiences with encounters with health personnel were identified: the respected women, the identified women and the abandoned women. Discussion The findings are discussed in terms of the ambivalent pregnant woman’s autonomous responsibility in considering an abortion and how her autonomy can be enabled or impaired during encounters with health personnel. Conclusion and implication Although the women considered themselves autonomous and responsible for their final decisions, they wished health personnel were involved in their situations. The health personnel contributed by enabling or disabling the possibility of decision-making in accordance with the women’s values. The findings indicate that health personnel who care for women considering abortions must be trained in dialogical competence.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsnb_NO
dc.titleBeyond autonomy and care: Experiences of ambivalent abortion seekersnb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionnb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber2135-2146nb_NO
dc.source.volume26nb_NO
dc.source.journalNursing Ethicsnb_NO
dc.source.issue7-8nb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0969733018819128
dc.identifier.cristin1676776
dc.description.localcodeThis is an author's accepted manuscript of an article published by Sage in Nursing Ethics, available at https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0969733018819128. The article is protected by copyright and reuse is restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses.nb_NO
cristin.unitcode194,65,80,0
cristin.unitnameInstitutt for helsevitenskap Ålesund
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode2


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